Ok, so the high school thing never took off... let's try this. Both my own response to the Frost quote question(I rather like Frost, but instead of defending him, I took the easy shot at being snarky and ironical), and Andrew's "mah niggah" comment got me to thinking. About the high level of irony and arch-cynicism in our culture, popular and otherwise. Is this a good or a bad thing? I mean, on some levels, I love it(I'm a Simpsons fan, after all), but I can't help thinking that it's made enthusiasm and sincerity scarce almost to the point of them not being taken seriously when they do appear. So, what do you think, has the irony and snarkiness gone too far, and thus lowered the potential level of honest, sincere connection between people? Discuss.
by Jared Dunn on 1/19/2001 03:12:23 PM | bang on

high school: living in cambridge meant I was in the middle of way more diversity, pc-hypersensitivity, and opportunity than most high school kids ever see. my classes were good at best, and at worst they at least managed not to hinder my education. I did science to my heart's content; I was an athlete and a geek and a volunteer; I worked in a harvard biology lab; I was allowed to be who I thought I wanted to be. people accepted me even without any sort of defining image or peer group or purpose. my senior year I even got up on stage in front of the entire school wearing white pleather hooker boots, a sparkly silver miniskirt, and a see-through shirt. which says a lot, I think, given that I was shy and known mostly as the co-captain of the science team.

but in the end, I learned the same things I would have anywhere else, about love and loneliness and pain and strength, not to mention condoms and birth control. so no, I wouldn't go back, not for a million dollars or a million fairy wishes, but I appreciate what it was. it hurt, because being one of two thousand teenagers is going to hurt no matter what, but I am not bitter. how much of that is personality and how much circumstance, I don't know.
by rabi on 1/15/2001 06:10:45 PM | bang on

The "letter to the world" bit furthers the melodrama in a tip of the hat to Emily Dickinson, and "and so on," as we all know, is a nod to mah niggah*, Kurt Vonnegut.

We had about 350 students in my graduating class, I think, so I guess I'm a little surprised we had so much freedom of expression in our yearbook (though as I mentioned, no one really used it like I did). As for a general high school thread, be warned: don't get me started. I find I always have something to say, some unburied hatchets to wield, regarding my fellow Plymouthians. Perhaps I'll put some thoughts together (and maximize conciseness) before the end of the day.
by andrew wollman on 1/15/2001 01:46:54 PM | bang on

Drat! We keep having topics that, for whatever reasons, I can't contribute to. So, I'll come up with some of my own(see below.) I didn't have a yearbook quote because I went to a crapass, poorly-funded public high school in a backwards small town in corn country. We couldn't afford no fancy schmantzy letters to the world and whatnot. We just had the standard picture + name + activities, with the added bonus of the picture being in color if you were a graduating senior. I do have a couple of amusing bits in mine though. Like this photo for D.A.R.E. where I looked stoned out of my mind(I wasn't), and the fact that I was the chosen representative for "Alternative" in the cheesy "fashion trends" section.

Mad props on the Emerson there Andrew. He's totally my homeboy, personal philosophy wise. You were way ahead of me as a hs senior. I was still trying to act 'hip" and rebellious by reading Nietzsche, smoking cigarettes, and wearing black occasionally(when I wasn't around my more jockish buddies), but understanding little to none of it at that point. Oh speaking of which, that's a good idea for yet another divergent thread...What was everyone's respective high school experience like? What kind of stuff were you into, what kind of person do you think you were then as compared to now, did you get a lot of shit, or fit in well, (So many of my friends here at school have horror stories. I came through remarkably unscathed, but I was lucky. I'll be more specific later if this takes off.) and so on?
by Jared Dunn on 1/15/2001 02:49:31 AM | bang on

hey that's good: this is my letter to the world and it is shorter than it should be. can a letter to the world ever be long enough, really?
by rabi on 1/14/2001 11:32:49 AM | bang on